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I like this quote. - A Sorta Fairytale
October 2013
 
 
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hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Thu, May. 26th, 2005 01:17 am
I like this quote.

No book is really worth reading at the age of ten which is not equally (and often far more) worth reading at the age of fifty--except, of course, books of information... Those of us who are blamed when old for reading childish books were blamed when children for reading books too old for us. No reader worth his salt trots along in obedience to a timetable.

~C.S. Lewis (as seen in someone's sig on TLC's message boards)

Also, if you like Star Wars, go vote in my poll about which order the movies should be viewed in. BTW, solusfides, the intro to that post was what I was whining about losing tonight. And yes, it did turn out better when I retyped it. I'm still annoyed I had to do it, though.

Joie

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Current Mood: tired tired

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solusfides
Jon
Thu, May. 26th, 2005 12:22 pm (UTC)
annoyance of having that second chance

And yes, it did turn out better when I retyped it. I'm still annoyed I had to do it, though.

alas, working with machines built by fallible humanity leaves us astray and found wanting by the same machines we rely so much upon.

well I'm glad it at least came out better the second time! While we don't like having to do things a second time, it usually does turn out better. We so much like to hang on the way we said things before, as there were some good things said in it, but like any other work of creativity, the second time allows us to find better ways.
I wonder how this concept could be applied to different areas of life?? And in what parts of life, this would find to be highly untrue, or even unhealthy?
I then wonder, how could this concept be turned into an artwork itself; expressing the full situation?


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koinegeek
koinegeek
Rit
Thu, May. 26th, 2005 05:15 pm (UTC)

Very nice quote! I wholeheartedly agree. In fact, I like re-reading those books I read as a youth since age brings a bit of insight and wisdom for better understanding the underlying meaning of those words read long ago.


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sarynx
sarynx
Jared
Fri, May. 27th, 2005 06:43 pm (UTC)

madeleine l'engle says that no worthwhile children's book comes from an author who decided, "i will write a book for children. i will use small words and simple elements so they will understand." she says she learned most of the words she knows by reading them when she didn't know what they meant yet.


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hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Wed, Jun. 15th, 2005 01:23 pm (UTC)

I disagree.


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hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Wed, Jun. 15th, 2005 09:22 pm (UTC)

Oops! I have no idea why the OP locked that entry. Anyway, here's what I said:

I think Leia remembers Padme through the Force. Yoda says to Luke in ESB, "Through the Force things you will see--the past, the future, old friends long gone." Leia's description sounds like Padme (beautiful, kind, and sad) and Luke does clarify that he is asking about her "real" mother. I don't think Leia would make a mistake and describe the Queen of Alderaan instead because of Luke's clarification, and because the Queen of Alderaan is played by an Asian actress and therefore doesn't look related to Leia; it seems Leia would have known she was adopted. Also, she describes her memories as "just images, feelings," which sounds like a good description of Force visions. Personally, besides the reasons I've already given, I don't like the explanation that she was really remembering the Queen of Alderaan, because I think it damages the emotional impact of Luke and Leia finally understanding the connection between them and their shared heritage if they start out the scene talking about the woman who raised Leia, rather than their shared biological mother.

Why, then, would she remember, but not Luke? The short answer is, "The Force works in mysterious ways." The long answer is that she may have a better connection to Padme because she is the same gender, had a similar upbringing and lifestyle (politics), and was raised by her mother's friend, who may have even had holograms and possessions of Padme's to pass on to Leia, enhancing Leia's Force memories of her. Luke, on the other hand, had a similar upbringing and lifestyle to Anakin's (Tatooine/Jedi), and therefore had more of a connection with him, enough to sense that there was good in him, whereas Leia apparently could not (at least, she didn't want Luke to attempt to rescue him from the Dark Side).

Now, having said all that, I think that Lucas probably didn't initially intend for this to be the case. I think he probably originally had in mind that the twins' mother lived and kept Leia for a short time, and when he wrote that dialogue in RotJ, he probably meant for her memories of her mother to be "real". But somewhere along the line, he changed his mind, and truth be told, he didn't do a very good job of covering over the continuity problem. *shrugs* But this explanation works well enough for me, so I thought I'd offer it.


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hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Thu, Jun. 16th, 2005 01:45 am (UTC)

Not in the movies she doesn't. And if you are talking about an EU book, those are not written by George Lucas, and are therefore superceded by information from the movies.

Luke: Leia, do you remember your mother? Your real mother?
Leia: Just a little bit. She died when I was very young.

That's what ROTJ says. That's what I go by.


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