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Looking for change *I* can believe in. - A Sorta Fairytale
October 2013
 
 
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hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Wed, Oct. 1st, 2008 11:34 pm
Looking for change *I* can believe in.

So last time I posted, I was in the 60% range for McCain and still in love with Sarah Palin. I still like Palin (and *really* don't want to hear any more criticism of her, esp. since she's not the real issue), but I'm having doubts about the ticket. This week all my political quiz results are coming out 50-50 again.

BTW, my hypothesis on the quiz that was going around earlier was that most people would score in the range of 60-70% vs. 30-40%. I haven't gotten around to tallying up the results yet, but really, you guys didn't give me much to go on. It's probably wrong, anyway. I think it was more wishful thinking that I'm not the only person in the country who feels this torn about presidential elections.

So the polls are swinging back to Obama, and lately so is this swing voter in a big swing state. THIS IS YOUR CHANCE to lure me to your side. You know you want to. ;)

It might help if you know the things that resonate with me:


Critical issues that I believe need the most attention:
1. Pro-life (human life and basic human rights) issues
-I support a seamless garment ethic of life from conception to natural death.
-The most immediate priority regarding abortion should be abortion reduction through social support, contraceptive availability, comprehensive sex ed, and reasonable restrictions such as parental notification laws.
-Legal protection for the unborn—as well as the dying and disabled—is a pressing need and should be viewed as a fundamental human right. Defending human life is the most important cause for social action, and I resent efforts to ghettoize anti-abortion concerns as "moral issues" or "family values" (that goes for people on both sides).
-I support policies that combat poverty and human rights abuses at home and abroad, especially policies that are most likely to have long-term results. AIDS relief, poverty relief—we should all be concerned about these issues. And the madness in Darfur really needs to stop.

2. Pro-conservation and energy/climate issues
-Climate change and overuse of nonrenewable resources are pressing concerns that require an immediate, broad range of responses, including market controls such as a carbon tax.
-MOAR (and better) public transportation, plz.


Issues I take great interest in (mostly because they affect me personally):
1. Free culture issues
-I favor net neutrality and IT policy that encourages free culture.
-I favor more lenient and sensible copyright laws for the digital age.

2. School choice
-I favor vouchers, charter schools, etc. for healthy competition to boost the entire educational system.

3. Freedom of religion/conscience and separation of church and state
-Separation of church and state is necessary in a free society, but it should not be misapplied to suppress the right to practice traditional religions.
-Non-theists shouldn't be subjected to ceremonial deism (e.g. "under God" in the pledge).
-A pluralistic, inclusive view toward religious holidays is best. Let people celebrate Christmas (and Hanukkah, etc.), for goodness sake. Observance of religious holidays and traditions—especially Christian and Jewish ones, but increasingly others as well—is an inextricable part of our culture. And it doesn't hurt anyone!
-Evolution should be taught in public schools, but materialist/naturalist dogma shouldn't be forced on students or teachers. It wouldn’t hurt the biology textbook to just *mention* the fact that some people (yes, even some scientists—I know it's hard to believe!) don’t believe the mechanisms of evolution alone are enough to fully explain the origin and diversity of life on the planet. Throw the designists and the panspermists a bone, and while you're at it, give students a chance to integrate science concepts with other fields such as politics, sociology, and philosophy—not to mention debate and critical reasoning. "It's not science" whining FTL; integrated curriculum FTW!


Other issues I have fairly strong feelings about:
1. Civil liberties
-I'm a 1st-amendment absolutist. Every side should have a fair chance to make their case, even the ones I dislike.
-I'm disturbed by the civil liberties abuses that have occurred due to the war in Iraq. Please stop imprisoning people without a trial, kthnxbai.

2. Healthcare reform
-I lean toward major reforms that would move us closer to socialized healthcare, although I would hesitate to cross that line completely. We need to find a way to make sure people can get their basic healthcare needs met.
-I'm pro-preventative healthcare, and think we could do more to promote fitness and clean living in an effort to stop people from getting preventable illnesses that drain the system.

3. Read my lips: no new tax cuts
-Seriously, people. We need to balance the budget and get out of debt without completely destroying social services.
-Most tax cuts that politicians propose or support seem like frivolous pandering to me. And I don't believe in trickle-down economics anymore, at least not when it comes to tax breaks. (Thanks, angua9.)
-Tax cuts/incentives should be used sparingly to promote things that benefit the whole country as much as the tax revenue would—things like clean energy and preventative healthcare.

4. I hesitate to say I’m "pro-gay rights", but I'm okay with most issues so labeled.
-Hate crime prevention is needed.
-Anti-discrimination laws are fine as long as they don’t interfere with freedom of religion.
-Fighting gay marriage is a waste of time and energy for conservatives. And people need to stop saying "gay marriage" in the same breath as "abortion."

5. Don't be to Iraq what Chris was to Miss Saigon.
-The war was wrong, but we're in it now, and things have actually improved lately.
-A withdrawal timetable probably wouldn't hurt, but leaving too suddenly is likely to do more harm than good—we need to clean up our mess as best we can first.


On most other issues I am not sufficiently convinced which approach is right; in some cases, I don't feel I know enough to decide.

Is it possible for me to decide on one candidate with true peace of mind? Help me out, flist!

Joie

P.S. Be nice. More flies with honey, remember?

Tags:
Current Mood: confused confused
Current Music: Miss Saigon ST ~ "The Confrontation"

16CommentReply

prettyveela
prettyveela
Jordan Catalano
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 04:16 am (UTC)

You know I was a Hillary supporter and was thrilled about the Palin pick but not anymore. I'm for Obama but I think McCain is a decent guy.

*sigh* I guess it just depends on how important you think the VP position is. I think the VP position is WAY more important now than it's ever been thanks to Gore and Cheney and both Palin and Biden have a chance of being president for totally different reasons(I don't want to go into it so I'll keep my mouth shut on that one) but if the VP position really isn't an issue for you then yeah.


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major_dallas
major_dallas
Nate the Great
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 05:29 am (UTC)

Well, the debate tomorrow night ought to be entertaining I think, you know what's disappointed me is this attempt to take Palin and make her a Washington Insider by the McCain Campaign. Governor Palin is not a DC Politician and she should go back to that, this does mean a lack of experience with Foreign Policy, true, but probably a more in line idea of Foreign Policy as many Americans who aren't in DC as well.


ReplyThread Parent
blpurdom
blpurdom
Prehumous Professor of Morbid Bibliomancy
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 04:53 am (UTC)

Critical Issues:
1. a) On the first part, the various ways of reducing abortion so that it would effectively become obsolete--that's where Obama comes down on it, definitely, whereas McCain/Palin have supported abstinence-only education and McCain has declined to pursue insurance companies footing the bill (at least partly) for prescription contraception for women. b) On the second part, neither Obama nor the Dems in general have any plank in the platform supporting a general protection of the unborn, with the exception of partial-birth abortion (unless the mother's life is in imminent danger) while the GOP is definitely wanting to overturn Roe v. Wade (which, it must be remembered, would only mean that individual states would again have leeway to outlaw abortion--even if it's overturned there's no guarantee of what will happen on a state-by-state basis). c) When it comes to the third part, Obama is again supporting the things you say you feel strongly about, while the GOP is not only not doing that but actively, it seems, trying to make life more difficult for people who are already poor (or, at best, not doing anything to make life better for those who are worst off in our society and elsewhere in the world). So that's 1/3 to the McCain and 2/3 to Obama on this one.

2. My take on this one is that Obama has the edge on the climate change issue; McCain's ongoing love for offshore drilling and for nuclear power, the waste from which we are already having difficulty storing, is in stark contrast to Obama's desire to explore sustainable energy sources that don't ravage the environment, risk our health or compound the already-bad global warming problem. So, cumulatively, that's 1/3 to McCain and 1 1/3 to Obama.

Second set of issues:
1. Quite honestly, I'm not sure where McCain stands on these, but I'd have a hard time imagining him being terribly restrictive or supporting that. I suspect that he and Obama are about even on this one. So if I'm right, that would be about 1 1/3 to McCain and 2 2/3 to Obama.

2. McCain definitely favors vouchers and Obama does not, so that would be an even 2 2/3 to McCain and 2 2/3 to Obama now. (We may be seeing here why you're turning out 50/50 on current quizes.)

3. a) Quite simply, McCain thinks the US is "a Christian nation" and Obama has spoken fervently about the beauty of separation of church and state. b) You probably already know that McCain/Palin are pretty clueless about this, including Palin thinking that "under God" was good enough for the "founding fathers" (most of whom died about 100+ years before the pledge was written, and 150+ years before "under God" was added to it). c) Obama is in line with what you prefer on this, while McCain is not. d) For the most part, Obama is where you are on this, too, while McCain--not so much. So that would now be McCain, 2 2/3 and Obama, 3 2/3.


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blpurdom
blpurdom
Prehumous Professor of Morbid Bibliomancy
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 04:54 am (UTC)

And the rest of the issues:
1. Civil liberties--I want to say McCain is 50/50 on this, although I'm not sure about how supportive he is, really, so I'm giving him the benefit of the doubt on that. Obama is fine on that without a doubt, but they both annoy me when it comes to FISA. So that's a half-point more to each--something like 3.17 to McCain and 4.17 to Obama.

2. McCain gets a big honking zero here, while Obama gets full points. McCain, 3.17; Obama, 5.17.

3. If you're against tax cuts to anyone and everyone, then neither candidate gets points from you here, since, even though they're promising to cut taxes for different people (McCain, mostly the rich, Obama, mostly the middle class and impoverished). Unless you're okay with some cuts for people making $200,000 and less, their scores remain unchanged.

4. a) Obama gets the nod here. b) In general, there is a problem right now with discriminatory laws specifically infringing on church/state separation and being discriminatory against people observing some religions, specifically gay-friendly ones, since not all marriage ceremonies in those religions (the same-gender ones) are recognized by the law, while mixed-gender marriages are, so the Dems are again pulling out in front on this. c) McCain is definitely pandering to a block of voters who are anti-gay marriage and devote a lot of time to pursuing the "protection" of marriage; while Obama has not come out "for" gay marriage, neither is he courting those who oppose it and he is in favor of legal protections for same-gender couples that would give them the same rights as marriage, which McCain is not (he wants to require everyone to hire lawyers to thrash out their legal relationships, and does not seem to realize that there are states that have passed laws against same-gender couples even doing that). So now that puts McCain still at 3.17 but Obama at 6.17.

5. Sounds like you're 100% with McCain on this one, but only about 50% with Obama.

That brings your final tally to 4.17 McCain and 6.67 Obama, which means Obama is in line with what's important to you about 50% more of the time than McCain is. Sounds like, in general, you're leaning much more toward the policies and attitudes of the Obama camp rather than McCain's, but you could probably live with McCain without too much trouble if he won the election. Sound like a fair assessment?


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warrioreowyn
warrioreowyn
warrioreowyn
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 05:23 am (UTC)

Gah! Formatting got erased on the earlier post. Here it is in more readable form:

My general impression is that on everything but school choice and abortion restrictions, your positions are very, very close to Obama's, more so than McCain (particularly on poverty, health care and the environment).

1.) Abortion.
This is probably your biggest problem with Obama; one of mine as well, but I can't disregard everything else I believe in in favour of a single issue, no matter how prominent. He does support expanding access to contraceptives and sex education (as well as abstinence education); he's also been a big promoter of men taking responsibility for their children and - if they won't marry the mother - legal methods to ensure child support payments are made. That alone, I think, would make single motherhood seem somewhat less economically crippling than it is, and it's a good thing in principle as well. I also think he's probably the only political leader that could address low-income black youth on this subject and have them listen.

The health care plan could also have an impact here - I may be misinformed, but I've heard that in the US just going to a hospital to give birth can be very expensive, so having that covered would be a good step forward.

2.) Global poverty.
This is probably the #1 thing I like about Obama. He intends to meet the Millennium Development Goals standard of 0.7% of GDP going to foreign aid, and to push the leaders of other G8 countries to do the same. Now, as a Canadian normally I don't like the US pushing us around, but I'd be the first to admit we need some nudging in this area: we have an big surplus for a country our size (something like $7 billion) and are still only giving 0.27% GDP, which is abysmal. Obama's also going to cancel all debts of Heavily-Indebted Poor Countries (as designated by the UN) - this is vital because a lot of third-world countries in debt end up paying out more on debt repayment, or just paying off the interest - than they receive in foreign aid. He'll also invest at least $50 billion over his first term in fighting HIV/AIDS.

3.) Poverty in the US. I like Obama's ideas on how to tackle this - they seem to be useful, pragmatic ones. He's going to invest in jobs to more people on welfare into the workforce, and into jobs with advancement opportunities (the latter part, I really like - moving someone from welfare to Wall-Mart greeter is not really a substantial accomplishment.) He's going to get low-income youth into "green jobs" in their communities - I'm thinking something along the lines of community gardens, small stuff but things that encourage young people to earn money doing something productive instead of turning to crime. He'll ensure that public transit investments are made in low-income neighbourhoods (VERY good - public transit is cheap and good for the environment; investing in it is far better than just giving people money for gas). He'll rase the minimum wage to $9.50/hr, because as things stand people can make min. wage and still be in poverty, and pass laws guaranteeing workers 7 paid sick days a year.

4.) Human rights. McCain is good here - kudos to him for opposing torture and committing to close Guantanamo! - so there's less to highlight about Obama. But Obama has said he'll end extraordinary rendition (sending someone to another nation to be tortured), and as an innocent Canadian man was subjected to it, that's a subject I care a good deal about. I don't know what McCain's position on rendition is.

I think there's a limited amount either leader could do on Sudan- its government won't let in UN peacekeepers, and short of an outright invasion that would be open to all the same accusations and problems as Iraq (Sudan is majority Muslim and has lots of oil), it's hard to get around that. Obama is going to ramp up the pressure on Sudan, and urge China to do the same... but that's about all that can be done as things stand. I don't like it either.

5.) Public transportation. With you on this one. My city (Vancouver, currently) has one of the best transit system I've ever seen. I already mentioned expanding access in low-income areas. More...


ReplyThread Parent
prettyannamoon
prettyannamoon
the laughing cat
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 08:35 pm (UTC)

This has nothing to do with anything, but...

I've heard that in the US just going to a hospital to give birth can be very expensive

I cost $4,627.50, and that was back in 1982!


ReplyThread Parent
warrioreowyn
warrioreowyn
warrioreowyn
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 05:18 am (UTC)

I agree with you on a lot of your priorities, so I'll discuss why I like Obama in the context of those. My general impression: on everything but school choice and abortion restrictions, your positions are very, very close to Obama's, more so than McCain (particularly on poverty, health care and the environment). 1.) Abortion. This is probably your biggest problem with Obama; one of mine as well, but I can't disregard everything else I believe in in favour of a single issue, no matter how prominent. He does support expanding access to contraceptives and sex education (as well as abstinence education); he's also been a big promoter of men taking responsibility for their children and - if they won't marry the mother - legal methods to ensure child support payments are made. That alone, I think, would make single motherhood seem somewhat less economically crippling than it is, and it's a good thing in principle as well. I also think he's probably the only political leader that could address low-income black youth on this subject and have them listen. The health care plan could also have an impact here - I may be misinformed, but I've heard that in the US just going to a hospital to give birth can be very expensive, so having that covered would be a good step forward. 2.) Global poverty. this is probably the #1 thing I like about Obama. He intends to meet the Millennium Development Goals standard of 0.7% of GDP going to foreign aid, and to push the leaders of other G8 countries to do the same. Now, as a Canadian normally I don't like the US pushing us around, but I'd be the first to admit we need some nudging in this area: we have an big surplus for a country our size (something like $7 billion) and are still only giving 0.27% GDP, which is abysmal. Obama's also going to cancel all debts of Heavily-Indebted Poor Countries (as designated by the UN) - this is vital because a lot of third-world countries in debt end up paying out more on debt repayment - or just paying off the interest - than they receive in foreign aid. He's also going to invest at least $50 billion over his first term in fighting HIV/AIDS. 3.) Poverty in the US. I like Obama's ideas on how to tackle this - they seem to be useful, pragmatic ones. He's going to invest in jobs to more people on welfare into the workforce, and into jobs with advancement opportunities (the latter part, I really like - moving someone from welfare to Wall-Mart greeter is not really a substantial accomplishment.) He's going to get low-income youth into "green jobs" in their communities - I'm thinking something along the lines of community gardens, small stuff but things that encourage young people to earn money doing something productive instead of turning to crime. He'll ensure that public transit investments are made in low-income neighbourhoods (VERY good - I use public transit, it's cheap and good for the environment, and investing in it is far better than just giving people money for gas). He'll rase the minimum wage to $9.50/hr, because as things stand people can make min. wage and still be in poverty, and pass laws guaranteeing workers 7 paid sick days a year. 4.) Human rights. McCain is good here - kudos to him for opposing torture and committing to close Guantanamo! - so there's less to highlight about Obama. But he has said he'll end extraordinary rendition (sending someone to another nation to be tortured), and as an innocent Canadian man was subjected to it, that's a subject I care a good deal about. I don't know what McCain's position on rendition is. I think there's a limited amount either leader could do on Sudan- its government won't let in UN peacekeepers, and short of an outright invasion that would be open to all the same accusations and problems as Iraq (Sudan is majority Muslim and has lots of oil), it's hard to get around that. Obama is going to ramp up the pressure on Sudan, and urge China to do the same... but that's about all that can be done as things stand. I don't like it either. 5.) Public transportation. With you on this one. My city (Vancouver, currently) has one of the best transit system I've ever seen. I already mentioned expanding access in low-income areas. More...


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warrioreowyn
warrioreowyn
warrioreowyn
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 05:18 am (UTC)

6.) Environment. I prefer Obama's focus on renewable energy to McCain's on drilling and 'clean coal' - but I'm also comfortable with the idea of nuclear energy. (Obama also supports clean coal and, once they've found a way to deal with the waste, nuclear energy - but they're not the cornerstones of his plan.) He has targets of 10% of energy coming from renewable sources by 2012, and 25% by 2015 - and ultimately reducing emissions by 80% of 1990 levels by 2050, the same target that is in the Kyoto Accords. (Wish my government would do the same!) Rather than a carbon tax, he (as well as McCain) has got a "cap and trade" system, which (I've heard from several environment sources) is considered more effective; I don't understand either plan well myself and wish they were better explained, but you can check his website and try to figure it out. General principle is you cap the total amount of emissions that can be produced, and industries that can reduce their emissions can sell their "rights" to pollute to more carbon-intensive industries, creating an economic incentive for companies to pollute less.

He's going to increase fuel economy standards for cars 4% each year, and convert all government cars to plug-in hybrids or electric cars by the end of his term. He supports tax credits for hybrids, and a $7000 tax credit for buying 'advanced vehicles.'

His plan also connects to poverty in the committment to "weatherize" a million homes of low-income people each year - substantially reducing both their heating bills and their energy use.

I also really like his idea of a new international forum of the G8 plus China, India, Brazil and South Africa (the main developing-nation carbon emitters) to work on how to fight climate change. It's about time we started dialoguing with the developing world as equals.

7. Health care.
I think Obama's very close to you here. His plan is nothing like "socialized health care" (or 'public health care' as well call it here in Canada; government-run, is the essence). It just gives people the option to buy into a government health insurance plan, while the health-care providers remain private; it's a good mix for the US, I think, where people in general seem more independent and less supportive of large government programs than people in Canada are. He also wants to get more generic drugs on the market, as they're way cheeper (and I have hope this will extent to his anti-AIDS policy, as one of the biggest challenges to saving lives is the exorbitant cost of the drugs and the restrictions on developing nations producing generics. Come on, most of the people who are dying won't get the antiretrovirals - dead people doesn't make money for the pharmaceutical industry!) Obama's also going to spend money supporting businesses and programs that promote healthy living.

8. Tax cuts. Go angua! - I'm passionately anti-supply-side and have always considered it basically a way for the government to scam the lower and middle classes into supporting tax cuts for the rich. No luck for you here - both candidates have big tax cut plans, but Obama's is target more towards the majority of people. Essentially, if people make under $110,000/yr (which is ~90% of Americans), they will benefit more from Obama's plan; if they make more than that they will benefit more from McCain's.

9. Gay marriage Totally agree with you on grouping it with abortion - one is an issue of preserving human life, the other an issue of imposing religious values on the wider society. Again, here I think you're closer to Obama, but the issue seems to be low-profile on the Republican ticket and is mostly being hashed out on state-level referenda.

10. Iraq. I personally expect Obama to be cautious about this - more so than I'd like. I expect him to be better than McCain because McCain supports permanent bases, which would only inflame Iraqi and general Muslim opinion against the US, while Obama does not support the bases. And my view is, if the Iraqi government says you should have a timetable to leave in around two years, you should do as they say - it's their country.

Whew! That was long - hope I didn't put you to sleep!


ReplyThread Parent
major_dallas
major_dallas
Nate the Great
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 05:23 am (UTC)

Well I am not going to do the scorecard grading system, sorry; if you want to know Senator McCain's stated positions, go here, I know its wikipedia but there are sources cited all over the place. Sorry Joie, this is as easy as I will make it for you, I loathe actually trying to sell people on who to vote for, rather, I like doing this, pointing to information that should be helpful in making up your own mind on the subject.


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major_dallas
major_dallas
Nate the Great
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 05:34 am (UTC)
to be Fair and Balanced ;)

and here is the page on Senator Obama's Political Positions...


ReplyThread Parent
queenriley
queenriley
QueenRiley
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 12:18 pm (UTC)
Re: to be Fair and Balanced ;)

Or to make it even easier on you, and to know you're getting info straight from the candidates on the issues as opposed to user-created wiki pages (sorry, I just think the candidate websites provide more comprehensive explanation than Wiki)...

Here is McCain's issues page from his website.

Here is Obama's issues page from his website.

Reading over what's important to you, I do think you fall slightly more towards Obama than McCain, but I also think you could be just as happy with a McCain presidency. You're in a tough spot. Have you thought about voting independent or are you set on going for one of the main two parties?


ReplyThread Parent
mrs_bombadil
Mrs. B.
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 12:06 pm (UTC)

I think that you are probably very clear-headed and informed on the issues and know how to give them appropriate weight based on their importance to you.

The excitement you experienced initially for Sarah Palin seemed to also be something you felt. So, the other aspects I would encourage you to consider are the more abstract, intangible considerations like who has the leadership qualities that are more likely to get their visions implemented at this time, given the situation our country is in right now. Who has the demeanor and credibility to respond to or even change the "mood" of the country? Who actually understands that mood? How do each stack up in ALL of the traits that produce competence? If you don't have an opinion on that, see if one emerges.

The combination of your head and heart may make it possible for you to find confirmation in your gut. My husband often votes that way and when he can't feel settled on all three fronts, then he usually lodges a protest vote (with the comfort/cover, however, of not voting in a swing state).


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prettyannamoon
prettyannamoon
the laughing cat
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 08:52 pm (UTC)

I think it was more wishful thinking that I'm not the only person in the country who feels this torn about presidential elections.

You're not! I've been volunteering at our local Obama office this week, and there are LOTS of undecideds out there, especially in states like Virginia and Florida.

Aside from that, what queenriley and mrs_bombadil said! It's easy to feel left out of (or pulled between) both parties because of the weird way some of the issues fall. But similar to what mrs_bombadil said, the overall message is also very important. You know I'm a pretty hard-line Democrat, but the first time I heard Obama speak about the things that draw us together as a country, I knew he was something special. I have hope and faith that he's what we need right now!


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thewhiteowl
thewhiteowl
Could use a little more cowbell
Thu, Oct. 2nd, 2008 11:05 pm (UTC)

We pretty much believe in the same thing. I know I would have difficult in the US political system.


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kawaiinekochi
kawaiinekochi
kawaiinekochi
Fri, Oct. 3rd, 2008 04:43 pm (UTC)

Wow, I didn't realize that we have so much in common when it comes to the issues. I compared and contrasted where I stand versus where the candidates stand. After all that comparing and contrasting (and quizzing), I found out I am more in favor of Obama. To be honest, I find him really inspirational and unique.

I suggest to keep studying the issues until you felt better about your choice, even it means going back and forth until Nov. 4th. I am glad you are not ignoring what the 'other side' has to offer. If all goes awry, you could always vote independent. (^_^)

Edited at 2008-10-04 04:04 am (UTC)


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tibbycat
tibbycat
Mark
Sun, Oct. 12th, 2008 01:30 pm (UTC)

Despite our little disagreement in my last post on politics, I read through your post here and found myself agreeing to a lot of things.

On the issue of health care, I think the US needs to adopt something along the lines of what Australia, Canada, and the UK have. It astounds me that Kristi was rejected for private health insurance. Wouldn't happen here at all. Also I like Australia's Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) where our government subsidizes certain medications. Maybe something like this could be created in the US. Mind you, the drug companies there might have an issue with such a thing. They tried, unsuccessfully, for Australia to get rid of the PBS during the free trade agreement between the US and Australia signed a few years ago by Bush and Howard.

On the issue of gay marriage, I'm torn on this. I don't think the definition of marriage should be changed. I have a moral objection to that as when I look at the bible I can't justify that homosexual practice is good, nor can I see how marriage between two people of the same sex is by definiation, marriage. And I'm not talking about Christian marriage necessarily as "marriage" predates Christianity, where it's always been between a man and a woman. But maybe civil partnerships could include the same tax benefits as heterosexual marriages have :/ My real concern with gay marriage is with adoption. It would strongly worry me if homosexual couples had the right to adopt children.


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