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Survey says... - A Sorta Fairytale
October 2013
 
 
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hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Fri, May. 28th, 2004 12:01 am
Survey says...

Here is an analysis I did some time ago of the data on age and ship preference from the Why do we SHIP the way we do? thread at FAP.


Ages of those who ship both R/Hr and H/Hr equally:

Mean: 15.42
Median: 16
Mode: 16
Range: 2.5
Youngest: 13.5
Oldest: 16

Frequencies:
Under 15: 1 or 16.7%
15-17: 5 or 83.3%
All other categories: 0 or 0%
Total: 6

Ages of those who ship H/Hr:

Mean: 18.40
Median: 18
Mode: 17
Range: 17
Youngest: 13
Oldest: 30

Frequencies:
Under 15: 5 or 10.5%
15-17: 23 or 40.4%
18-22: 18 or 31.4%
23-29: 8 or 14.0%
30+: 1 or 1.8%
Age not given: 1 or 1.8%
Total: 57

Ages of those who ship R/Hr:

Mean: 18.58
Median: 18
Mode: 16
Range: 31
Youngest: 13
Oldest: 44

Frequencies:
Under 15: 19 or 18.6%
15-17: 31 or 30.4%
18-22: 30 or 29.4%
23-29: 8 or 7.8%
30+: 5 or 4.9%
Age not given: 9 or 8.8%
Total: 102


Well, it’s been a few years since I took statistics, so I admit I’m not 100% sure if we can draw any conclusions (once upon a time, I knew how to test for statistical significance). However, I’d say that from this data it certainly appears that there is no correlation between age and preference for R/Hr or H/Hr.

hymnia

2CommentReply

gifted_dream
gifted_dream
Erika
Fri, May. 28th, 2004 10:43 am (UTC)

Wow, that must of taken a while...But thanks for taking the time, it's quite interesting.:).


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dr_c
dr_c
Doctor Cornelius
Sun, Jun. 13th, 2004 04:29 am (UTC)

Ooh... a statistics post that I missed!

To do formal hypothesis testing, you have to set the hypothesis before collecting the data. Otherwise you can cherry-pick the data, and say, "Hey, look, five out of six thirtysomethings are R/Hers!" The problem there is that in any data sample that you slice enough ways, you're sure to eventually get some slice that appears to mean something, even if the data were generated totally at random. And the smaller the sample is (six 30+ respondents in this case), the more greater the danger of an unfounded conclusion.

It does appear probable that early-teen readers are more likely to ship R/H and H/H equally-- but I say that largely on intuitive grounds (i.e. on knowledge of how people of different ages tend to read), and not purely based on the data sample given.

It would be more interesting to correlate Trio ship preference with reasons for that preference. A 13-year-old who ships H/H because she thinks Harry's the coolest guy in the series and Hermione's the coolest girl, is a very different sort of reader from a 26-year-old with a Master's degree in English Literature who ships H/H because the canonical series' tendency toward R/H reflects JKR's unthinking acceptance of the ideological bias that affirms large, happy, traditional families as normal and says that it's not a big deal to hold traditional prejudices like Ron does without becoming unsuitable for a more politically enlightened character like Hermione (who continually attempts to burst the domineering bands the author attempts to place on her).


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