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Shakespeare quote meme - A Sorta Fairytale
October 2013
 
 
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hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Sat, Sep. 24th, 2005 02:01 pm
Shakespeare quote meme

Gacked from koinegeek:

If you see this on your friends list, add a Shakespeare quote of your own!

Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more;
Men were deceivers ever;
One foot in sea and one on shore,
To one thing constant never;
Then sigh not so,
But let them go,
And be you blithe and bonny;
Converting all your sounds of woe
Into, Hey nonny, nonny.

Sing no more ditties, sing no mo',
Or dumps so dull and heavy;
The fraud of men was ever so,
Since summer first was leavy.
Then sigh not so,
But let them go,
And be you blithe and bonny,
Converting all your sounds of woe
Into, Hey, nonny, nonny.


There are several lovely musical settings of this out there, but my favorite is the one in the 1993 film of Much Ado About Nothing.

ETA:

Gacked from springdove:

When you see this, you must post a poem you like in your journal. And now you've seen it! HA!

Some say the world will end in fire,
Some say in ice.
From what I’ve tasted of desire
I hold with those who favor fire.
But if it had to perish twice,
I think I know enough of hate
To know that for destruction ice
Is also great
And would suffice.


Robert Frost is not my favorite poet, but I just love the rhyme scheme of this poem. It always gives me little shivers.

I'm not bothering with LJ cuts. If you really don't want to do these, be a grown up and realize that you will not be struck down by the LJ meme gods if you don't. :P

Also, I would just like to announce that I have a new fannish obsession lately: Inuyasha. Anyone else out there watching this one on Adult Swim (or by other means--there's about a zillion episodes that can be found either dubbed or subtitled or both on the internet)?

Joie

Tags: , , ,
Current Mood: good blithe and bonny
Current Music: "Hey nonny nonny..."

7CommentReply

kruszer
kruszer
Kristine
Sat, Sep. 24th, 2005 07:41 pm (UTC)

A poem that I like was from my sixth or seventh grade reader... and it's pretty morbid considering the target audience.


FANCY DIVE

The fanciest dive that ever was dove
Was done by Melissa of Coconut Grove.
She bounced on the board and flew into the air
With a twist of her head and a twirl of her hair.
She did thirty-four jackknives, backflipped and spun,
Quadruple gainered, and reached for the sun,
And then somersaulted nine times and a quarter--
And looked down and saw that the pool had no water.

Shell Silverstien


ReplyThread
hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Sat, Sep. 24th, 2005 07:44 pm (UTC)

I love Shel Silverstein! My favorite of his is more wistful:

Once I spoke the language of the flowers,
Once I understood each word the caterpillar said,
Once I smiled in secret at the gossip of the starlings,
And shared a conversation with the housefly
in my bed.
Once I heard and answered all the questions
of the crickets,
And joined the crying of each falling dying
flake of snow,
Once I spoke the language of the flowers. . . .
How did it go?
How did it go?


I set it to music when I was sixteen or so. I wonder if I can still remember the tune?


ReplyThread Parent
connielane
connielane
Black Mamba
Sat, Sep. 24th, 2005 08:16 pm (UTC)

There are several lovely musical settings of this out there, but my favorite is the one in the 1993 film of Much Ado About Nothing.

Oh, I love that, too! I think it's cool that Patrick Doyle did his own vocals on that. :)

Now for the Bard quotage (and possibly the most controversial & misinterpreted passage in any of his plays :P):

I am ashamed that women are so simple
To offer war where they should kneel for peace;
Or seek for rule, supremacy and sway,
When they are bound to serve, love and obey.
Why are our bodies soft and weak and smooth,
Unapt to toil and trouble in the world,
But that our soft conditions and our hearts
Should well agree with our external parts?
Come, come, you froward and unable worms!
My mind hath been as big as one of yours,
My heart as great, my reason haply more,
To bandy word for word and frown for frown;
But now I see our lances are but straws,
Our strength as weak, our weakness past compare,
That seeming to be most which we indeed least are.
Then vail your stomachs, for it is no boot,
And place your hands below your husband's foot:
In token of which duty, if he please,
My hand is ready; may it do him ease.


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hymnia
hymnia
Joie
Sat, Sep. 24th, 2005 08:26 pm (UTC)

Ah, yes. Of course you would choose that one, you unfeminist OBHWFer, you. :P (I'd love to hear your interpretation of that passage, BTW, if you have the time and inclination).


ReplyThread Parent
connielane
connielane
Black Mamba
Sat, Sep. 24th, 2005 09:05 pm (UTC)

Well, the short version is that I think she's being somewhat sarcastic. She means what she says - in front of other people - but behind closed doors it's another story altogether. I think this speech is her realization of how to make her marriage to Petruchio work - be submissive to him in public and he'll be submissive to her at home.

That play gets such a bad rap from feminists, but it's actually strikingly (not to mention ironically) feminist.


ReplyThread Parent
crjace
crjace
crjace
Sun, Sep. 25th, 2005 03:05 am (UTC)

Victor and I love Inuyasha! In fact, I'm about to watch it right now . . .


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dim54
dim54
dim54
Sun, Sep. 25th, 2005 06:33 pm (UTC)

I love that poem! I was just thinking about it.


ReplyThread